Forward Thinking

Latest news and innovations from Oxford Economics

Pandemic hotspots, vulnerable workers: New York, New Jersey & Florida

Posted by Hamilton Galloway and Edward Cone on Mar 30, 2020 1:48:51 PM

Three of the most populous states, including hard-hit New York, have aging healthcare workforces that may be more vulnerable to the novel coronavirus pandemic. 

The healthcare workforces of New York, New Jersey, and Florida skew older than national averages, including more workers over 60 years old a key group at risk for coronavirus. New York is the US epicenter for the pandemic, neighboring New Jersey is another early hotspot, and Florida’s caseload is growing rapidly.

Read More

Topics: Economic impact, United States, Health, Economic forecasting, Economic risk, Workplace, Global economy, Coronavirus

Combatting illicit trade – consumer motivations and stakeholder perspectives

Posted by Thought Leadership on Jul 3, 2018 2:34:12 PM

Illicit trade is a persistent and growing threat, as technology, the global economy and e-commerce open new opportunities for counterfeit products to infiltrate supply chains and provide consumers with illicit products. Many understand the risks—that illicit trade can cause serious public health issues, and that the proceeds from illicit sales fund other criminal activities. Others view some form of illicit trade as the soft underbelly of the global economy— the price to be paid for frictionless trade.

A new study from Oxford Economics seeks to understand this evolving issue better—specifically, the attitudes and behaviours of those that influence the demand and the supply for illicit goods, so that illicit trade can be contained. We surveyed more than 37,000 consumers, across 37 European countries, buying five products; cigarettes and tobacco, alcoholic drinks, films, music and games, clothing and accessories and medicines.

Read More

Topics: Thought leadership, Trade, Public policy and regulations, Global trade, Global economy, Illicit Trade

Looming liquidity drain raises bond market risks

Posted by Oxford Economics on Jun 19, 2018 8:25:57 PM

Markets’ attention in recent weeks and months has been focused intently on central bank policy actions as the US Federal Reserve and European Central Bank have pressed ahead with further moves toward ending the era of historically low interest rates and easy money. Yet beneath the surface of the world economy, potent trends in global liquidity driven by the vast capital flows across fixed income markets have commanded far less scrutiny – despite far-reaching implications.

A large liquidity squeeze looms, with equally large potential consequences. Cross-border bond purchases by fixed income investors could plausibly drop by more than half this year and next, to an average of only $500 billion a year, versus 2017’s tally of $1.2 trillion.

Read More

Topics: Global economics, ECB, Bond market, Fixed income, Capital flows, Federal Reserve, Quantitative easing, Dollar, Euro, Global liquidity, Global economy

Recent Posts

Subscribe to Email Updates

Posts by Topic

see all